Selvedge are special hooked needle driven by a cam which produces, after cutting, the insertion of the protruding thread end into the subsequent shed, thus forming a stronger edge. The basic function of any selvedge is to lock the outside warp threads of a piece of cloth and so prevent fraying. The selvedge should be strong enough to withstand the strains of the stenter in the finishing process. - The selvedge should have a neat and uniform appearance.


In this page

  1. Selvedges
  2. Leno selvedges
  3. Fused selvedges
  4. Devices for centre selvedges

Selvedges

Selvedges WeavingSelvedges MechanismA special hooked needle driven by a cam produces, after cutting, the insertion of the protruding thread end into the subsequent shed, thus forming a stronger edge.

This system is generally used for light to middle weight fabrics, when weave and fabric density permit. There are also available tuck-in selvedge motions which are entirely controlled by pneumatic or mixed pneumatic and mechanical devices.



Leno selvedges

Leno Selvedges WeavingLeno Selvedges MechnismThese selvedges are obtained by binding the wefts with strong additional threads working in gauze weave and by eliminating through cutting the protruding weft ends.

The leno gauze system is optimally suited for heavy fabrics, blankets, wall coverings. Fig. 116 illustrates the operation scheme of the device proposed by a manufacturer, in which device two complete leno gauze mechanisms work in combination. A leno device produces the fabric selvedge, while the other device forms the auxiliary selvedge.

Fused selvedges

These are obtained by pressing a hot mechanical element on the fabric edge; this method can be applied on fabrics in man-made fibres.

Devices for centre selvedges

All these three systems allow the formation
also of centre or  ″split″ selvedges, when
several lengths of cloth are woven on the same
machine.

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