Skirt is something that covers the lower part of the body especially for girls, women or ladies. Skirts come in a variety of shapes and styles and they are essential items in women’s wardrobes. Skirts are more elegant and easy to wear and besides they can be worn in all occasions. It is easier to design skirt than any other garment. In today’s fashion world we find a variety of types of skirt which can be categorized based on size, fabric, and design. The silhouette can be narrow, flared or bouffant. Even straight skirts can vary from extremely tight and narrow at the hem to slightly A-lined. Here is a brief description of the variety of skirt types being used on their vast types.


In this page

  1. Introduction
  2. Types of skirts based on their lengths
  3. Skirts based on design- Based on invariable designs the skirts can be classified into the following types

Introduction

skirt

Skirt is something that covers the lower part of the body especially for girls, women or ladies. Skirts come in a variety of shapes and styles and they are essential items in women’s wardrobes. Skirts are more elegant and easy to wear and besides they can be worn in all occasions. It is easier to design skirt than any other garment. In today’s fashion world we find a variety of types of skirt which can be categorized based on size, fabric, and design. The silhouette can be narrow, flared or bouffant. Even straight skirts can vary from extremely tight and narrow at the hem to slightly A-lined. Here is a brief description of the variety of skirt types being used on their vast types.



Types of skirts based on their lengths

  • Normal skirt

    It is a normal skirt which is 2-3“below the knee size.

  • Micro mini skirt

    These skirts have length which extends 10” from the waist above the mid-thigh.

  • Miniskirt

    The skirt whose length ends at mid-thigh level, are called mini skirt. These are very short and are usually long enough to reach between the crotch and the knees i.e. about 3”-5” below crotch). They are casual or semi-dressy. In dressy or formal settings, they can be inappropriate.

  • Ballerina skirt

    The skirt which ends at mid-calf level is called ballerina skirt.

  • Maxi skirt

    Maxi skirts are those skirts whose length extends till the ankle or floor. These lengths vary a little based on vary to fashion and customers taste.

  • Broomstick skirts

    Broomstick skirts are either knee-length or ankle length and they have a wrinkled appearance. They are characterized by the three, or more, horizontal seams that wrap around the skirt in layers. They are either casual or semi-casual but cannot be dressy.

Skirts based on design- Based on invariable designs the skirts can be classified into the following types

  • Basic skirt

    The basic skirt will have the darts of equal lengths in the form of fullness at the waist line in the front and back. The pattern obtained can be used as the base for any other skirt with a hemline sweep that is equal on the front and back.

  • Pleated skirt

    A pleat is a fold in the fabric that releases fullness. These types of have lots of pleats of similar size around the waistline. It helps in giving an extra fullness to the skirt. Pleated skirts have vertical pleats running up and down the skirt all the way around. When there is movement, the skirt appears to open up. Pleats can be of various types and therefore have specific names for specific pleat based on their design for eg. box pleated skirt, inverted pleat skirt , sunburst pleated skirt. Knife pleated skirts and, accordion pleated skirt. These either reach to the knee or above the knee, and they require ironing. Pleated skirts are casual or semi-dressy.

  • Skirt with least flare

    This type of skirt fits the waist tightly with only two darts and has only 1” to 2” ease allowance on the hipline. About 2” flare is added on the side seam of skirt for freedom of movement.

    Making of least flare skirt

    minimum flared skirt

    Draw rectangle ABCD, where AB = ¼ hip + 2½” (½” - ease; 2” - flare at hemline) &BC = skirt length. Mark AG - BF = Waist to hip measurement (usually - 6” to 9”). Join GF .AE = ¼ waist + 1¼ (1” for dart; ¼” for ease allowance). AA1 =½”. Join A1 E ;GH - ¼ Seat + ½” for ease allowance. Join EHC Mark CC1 = 1”. Mark points ½” on either side of O and connects to P.

  • Circular skirt

    As the name suggest, this skirt looks like a circle when open fully therefore a fabric having maximum width is required for these kinds of skirt. The fabric is cut in a circle, like a donut. Then the elastic is sewn on top to create a waistband. The circle hangs right at the waist and allows the fabric to drape beautifully around you. These skirts do not need any side seam.

  • A line skirt

    A line skirts represent the shape of the capital letter”A” hence the name i.e. An A line skirt is a skirt that is fitted at the hips and gradually widens towards the hem, giving the impression of the shape of a capital letter A. The waistline measurement remains the same as in plain skirt but fullness is added to hem so that its circumference increases. If more fullness is added at the waistline then it becomes a flared skirt. It is also one of the easiest garments for a beginner to make. It has only three pattern pieces a front, a back, and a waistband.

  • Gored skirt

    A gore is a triangular piece of fabric. A gored skirt is one with gores which are narrow at the waistline and wider at the hemline. It can have any number of gores which can be equally or unequally spaced as ‘desired’ by the wearer. The gore can be of various types such as angled, flared, and pleated or may be straight from the hip level. There are two basic types of gored skirts are6-gore and 4-gore skirt. These kind of skirts are preferred for bulky fabrics where in on finds difficult to gather the fabric at waist.

    Making a gored skirt

    gored skirt

    Draw a rectangle ABCD, where AD =Skirt length; AB = 16” (Remove 4” for band along The width of the fabric and remaining 32” in folded). AE = CF = 1/8 waist + ½” ease allowance. Join EF Leave ½” below A, E, C, F. Draw curved lines on all these points to make a skirt.

  • Gathered skirt

    Gathered skirts are as the name suggests skirts that have gathers at the waistline. Usually thin fabrics are used for making these types of skirts as they can be gathered easily and there is no difficulty in stitching at the waistline where as Bulky fabrics can have limited fullness as there will be difficulty in stitching it to the waistline. For a good gathered skirt the length of fabric according to the length of the skirt +2” (for folding) and width of the skirt must be twice the amount of waist circumference for gathering.

  • High and Low waist skirt

    Low and high waisted refer to where the garment's waistline is meant to sit relative to one’s torso. For example, low waisted skirts are designed to sit on the hips where as high waisted skirts are designed to sit higher than the belly button. Low waisted Skirt is 3½” down from the natural waistline and a high waisted skirt has extended waistline at any desired amount. The low waisted hugs the hipline below the waistline whereas the high waisted skirt extends above the natural waistline.

  • Layered skirt /Tiered skirt

    Also called as tiered skirt layered skirts are skirts which have layers of fabric attached to the each other at the hemline. The length and width of each layer may be same or may vary. Each gives a different look. The fabric used may or may not be the same. Frills can also be attached.

  • Pencil skirt

    Pencil skirt lengthens from the waist to beneath the knees or down to mid-calf. It hugs the body and is usually made from stretchable fabric. These kinds of skirts are preferred by slim figured women or girls. They are straight cut therefore makes it difficult to walk in. These are dressy or formal skirts. The hemlines are decorated by adding colored ribbons, fringes etc.

  • Pegged skirt

    It is also known as peg-top or inverted skirt as it has fullness introduced at the waistline and with no fullness at the hemline. The skirt may be gathered, pleated into the waistband.

  • Bubble skirt

    Create a bubble effect at the bottom of the hem which is tucked back under. The bubble skirt consists of an outer skirt which is gathered onto a lining. Bubble garments look best in rather light fabrics such as (double) gauze and lawn.

  • Skirt with peplum

    Peplum skirts are an extra overskirt flounce sewn onto, and dropping from the waistline or waistband. Peplums extend from the waist, down till the hip.

  • Godet skirt

    A godet is an extra piece of fabric in the shape of a circular sector which is set into a garment, usually a dress or skirt. The addition of a godet causes the article of clothing in question to flare, thus adding width and volume. Adding a godet to a piece of clothing also gives the wearer a wider range of motion.