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Advancements in Reactive Textile Dyes

Classifications, characteristics, developments, and advancements in Reactive Textile Dyes

The market for reactive dyes will continue to increase. This will arise partly from a marginal increase in the production of cellulosic fibres, essentially cotton, and more importantly from the replacement of other classes of cellulose dye, such as azoic and sulphur dyes, by reactive dyes.

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Conclusion

The market for reactive dyes will continue to increase. This will arise partly from a marginal increase in the production of cellulosic fibres, essentially cotton, and more importantly from the replacement of other classes of cellulose dye, such as azoic and sulphur dyes, by reactive dyes.

The major driving force of reactive dye research and product development over the past decade falls into three broad categories: the need for products with greater economy, better environmental performance and improved technical properties. These have been achieved by a variety of means. The greater economy has been gained by using more efficient dye manufacturing processes, shortening dyeing cycles, increasing the percentage of right-first-time dye house production the use of more fixation efficient dyes and the use of stronger chromophores.

Often these requirements overlap. These are likely to remain the key drivers over the next decade. Much effort has been expended on achieving complete fixation of dye to cotton. To date, no satisfactory way of achieving this has been commercialized but recent patent claims suggest that fixation yields of greater than 99% are possible. If these claims are verified it might appear that there are few further improvements to be made in reactive dye technology.


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