Skip and Pointed Twills

fabric weaving Skip twills are a type of broken twill effects formed by a skip drawing-in draft and a regular twill weave as a chain draft. The weaves that form a wave effects across the cloth known as pointed twills. These effects are also frequently spoken of as herring banes, or herring-bones stripes, because the radiating twill lines suggest the radiating bones of a fish's backbone.

Air Jet Weaving Machines

fabric weaving The Air Jet weaving machines are the weaving machines with the highest weft insertion performance and are considered as the most productive in the manufacturing of light to medium weight fabrics, preferably made of cotton and certain man-made fibres. These machines are the ideal solution for those who want to produce bulk quantities of customized fabric styles. The weaving widths range generally from 190 to 400 cm.

Water Jet Weaving Machines

fabric weaving Water Jet machines are extensively used in East Asia. They are characterized in particular by high insertion performance and low energy consumption. These machines are produced only by few companies and are used for the manufacture of light and medium weight fabrics with standard characteristics and in water repellent fibre materials, primarily multi-filament synthetic yarns. They are characterized in particular by high insertion performance and low energy consumption.

Special Weaving Machines

fabric weaving Weaving machines used for manufacturing terry fabrics, double velvets and narrow fabrics are categorized in special weaving machines. Some of the examples of such machines are terry weaving machines, double velvet weaving machines, ribbon weaving machines etc.

Bearing Structure of a Weaving Machine

fabric weaving The weaving machines are composed of two side frames in cast iron or steel, which are connected each other by cross members so as to create a firm bearing structure which can limit the vibrations and offer a good stability.

Warp let-off and fabric take-up

fabric weaving Warp let-off system has a frequency converter, which is intended for letting off from warp beam or feeding unit. The drive is mounted either on the weaving machine or on a frame positioned behind the weaving machine. The let-off starts with a machine running signal; the speed of the let-off motor is controlled by a proximity switch mounted on the whip roller system and an internal speed memory. An alarm signal switches the weaving machine off in case of over tightened warp or any other error.

Shedding machines

fabric weaving The angle which is formed by the raising threads with the threads remaining in low position is called shed. The shed must be as wide open as to permit the easy passage of the weft insertion element. The shed can be obtained by either moving the heald frames or by directly moving the heald frames through. The machines used to form the shed are cam machines, dobbies and Jacquard machines.

Drive and control of weaving machines

fabric weaving The latest weaving machines are equipped with microprocessor or PLC units which ensure continuously the control, the drive and the monitoring of the various machine members and of the various functions. One of the ways to increase production is to design and manufacture particular weaving machines which can offer very high weft insertion rates.

Weaving Equipments

fabric weaving Special equipments to improve efficiency and accuracy of weaving machines, reducing manual work are required. With a view to increase the efficiency and the flexibility of the weaving machines, the manufacturers have made considerable efforts to find solutions capable of simplifying and speeding up the operations and the machine settings at style changing and to permit coping better with particular production requirements.

Weft feeders

fabric weaving Weft feeders are feeding devices, which are also called weft storage feeders or weft accumulators, play an important role in the weaving machines where the weft is unwound overhead from the cone and is subjected to abrupt accelerations due to the drawing-off tension exerted by the insertion element. The balloon which is formed at each insertion can cause coil sliding and snarls, owing to the difficulty of braking adequately the yarn and to the high unwinding speed of the yarn from the cone.